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Faqs

  • How Do I Know If My Pet Should See a Neurologist?
    Neurologists are veterinarians with expertise and advanced training in conditions affecting the brain, spinal cord, nerves and muscles. Common neurological conditions in dogs and cats include seizures, intervertebral disk disease, balance problems and vertigo, atlantoaxial instability, diskospondylitis, encephalitis and meningitis and many others.  Symptoms may range from convulsions, changes in behavior, bumping into things, walking wobbly or with a head tilt, dragging of the back legs or paws, walking in circles and many others.  If your pet is exhibiting strange behaviors, he or she may be having a neurological problem and may benefit from seeing a specialist in neurology.
  • What Should I Expect at My Consultation?
    An experienced, caring veterinary nurse will get some information from you with regards to what is going on with your pet.  They will ask questions like "How long have the symptoms been present?", "What medications and treatments have been tried?", "Is the problem getting better, worse, staying the same, or waxing and waning?".  You will then meet with one of our doctors, who will complete a physical examination as well as a neurological examination.  The neurological examination involves testing the brain, spinal cord, nerves and muscles.  Our neurologists will be patient, thorough and gentle with your pet. After examination, our neurologists will discuss with you 1. if your pet's symptoms are due to a neurological problem, 2. where in the neurological system your pet's problem is 3. what the possible causes are and 4. make a recommendation to determine the best course of action to determine the cause and help your pet feel better. Many times, we recommend an MRI to evaluate the brain and/or spinal cord.
  • Why Does My Pet Need an MRI? I Already Have X-Rays.
    Radiographs (x-rays) are a useful diagnostic aid, especially for viewing the bones in the limbs, the heart and lungs, and abdomen.  Sometimes they may be useful for looking for neck and back problems, but are quite limited in what they can show.  X-rays of the spine can show broken bones, and can sometimes show tumors or infections of bone. Just like in people, when it comes to viewing the brain or spinal cord, X-rays typically do not show enough to get the whole picture.  Diseases like slipped disks, meningitis, infections, tumors and almost every other spinal cord condition are best seen with an MRI.  Similarly, most brain conditions like encephalitis, strokes, tumors and other abnormalities can only be seen with an MRI.
  • Does My Pet Need to Stay Overnight for Diagnostic Testing?
    Since our magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is on-site, your pet will never have to leave our hospital for testing or treatment. Many patients can receive an MRI the same day. In certain situations, an MRI will be scheduled for the following day or at your convenience. Sometimes pets do need to stay overnight after testing or for treatment.  It is always best to be ready for this by bringing your pet's medications or any special food with you to the appointment, just in case.
  • If My Pet Has Surgery, Will He Be Able to Resume His Normal Activities Again?
    Depending on the underlying cause and the severity of the injury, many dogs make a full recovery. Full recovery may take time. Our neurologists have a 95% surgical success rate for dogs that can still feel their limbs but cannot walk due to a slipped disk. Many dogs that cannot walk can worsen over even a short period of time, and a window of opportunity may be lost. For this reason, if your pet suddenly starts dragging the limbs, please call us immediately. To learn more about Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD), click here.
  • My Pet Might Have a Brain Tumor. If He Does, Is Euthanasia My Only Option?
    Many options exist for treating brain tumors. Some tumors can be completely removed surgically. Others may be treated with radiation, chemotherapy or medications. Southeast Veterinary Neurology offers a number of options to give your pet a good quality of life even with the diagnosis of a brain tumor.
  • If My Pet Is Prescribed Medications, Will He Need to Be on It His Whole Life?
    Southeast Veterinary Neurology’s goal is to minimize the number of medications needed to control your pet’s condition. Some conditions require lifelong or long-term usage, while other medications are only for a short period of time. Please do not reduce the dosage or discontinue your pet’s medications with first consulting your neurologist.
  • When Can I Bathe My Pet after Spinal Surgery?
    Please do not bathe your pet until after the sutures have been removed at your pet’s follow-up visit. If your pet soils himself, you may bathe that part, but avoid getting the incision area wet. Most pets can have a bath once their stitches are removed, however, if your pet is anxious about baths or runs/shakes vigorously after a bath, you should wait an extra week or two. If in doubt, please ask us at your pet’s follow-up visit.

Have more questions?
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(305) 274-2777

Miami Location
9300 SW 40th Street
Miami, FL 33165

(305) 274-2777

Miami@SEVNeurology.com

Boynton Beach Location
7280 W Boynton Beach Blvd
Boynton Beach, FL 33437

(305) 274-2777

Miami@SEVNeurology.com

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